Who is she?

Hanna Rosin is an American author, writer, and reporter. She writes for The Atlantic and has written for The Washington Post, The New Yorker, GQ, New York Magazine, and The New Republic. She has written two books, God’s Harvard (2007) and The End of Men: And the Rise of Women (2012). Most notably, she is the co-host of the NPR podcast Invisibilia and the co-founder of DoubleX, an affiliate website of Slate magazine.

 

What does she do?

Born in Israel, Rosin grew up in Queens. A precocious high schooler, she won a number of competitions on her school’s debate team. These wins, combined with her exemplary test scores and grades, helped Rosin gain acceptance to Stanford University. Rosin has spent much of her career as a writer, publishing primarily in The New Republic and The Atlantic.

Rosin’s interests are wide-reaching, but in the past, she has specialized in writing about religious and political issues, particularly the influence of evangelical Christians on the 2004 U.S. presidential campaign. She has also published several controversial articles, such as “The Care Against Breast-Feeding,” which appeared in The Atlantic in 2009.

Rosin has been nominated and won several awards for her writing and storytelling, including a National Magazine Award nomination for a story about a young transgender girl; an award for a package of stories about circumcision; and a feature writing award from the Education Writer’s Association for a story about the suicide clusters at Palo Alto High schools. Her stories have also been included in anthologies of Best American Magazine Writing and Best American Crime Reporting.

 

Why watch?

Rosin’s NPR podcast, Invisibilia, recently entered its fifth season. In this podcast, she tells stories about the invisible forces that shape human behavior alongside Alix Spiegel and Lulu Miller, NPR veterans. While it has not yet won any awards, this season has a strong showing. We expect Rosin to add a radio or podcast award to her slew of writing accolades sometime in the next year.